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Today, Personal Branding Is More Important Than Ever

Personal Branding is More Important than EverWith social media and the gig economy, it has become essential to embrace personal branding. Here are the reasons why it’s more important than ever.
Whether you know it or not, you have a personal brand. Internet search results are the first impression people will have of you. Is it a good one? Is the information you are sharing across LinkedIn, Facebook, and other social media sites consistent? 

Whether you have a date or a job interview, chances are someone is going to Google you to learn more about who you are. The question is, do you want to allow your online reputation to take on a life of its own or control the narrative? With the proliferation of social media and the gig economy, it has become essential for everyone to embrace personal branding.

What is personal branding?

Jeff Bezos, the founder of Amazon, is famously quoted as saying, “Your brand is what people say about you when you’re not in the room.” The term “branding” used to be reserved for businesses, but with the advent of social sites and the gig economy, personal branding has become fundamental.

A personal brand is a unique combination of skills and experiences that make you who you are. It is how you present yourself to the world. Effective personal branding will differentiate you from the competition and allow you to build trust with prospective clients and employers.

Building a personal brand 

Whether you’re an employee or entrepreneur, cultivating a personal brand has become more important than ever. One reason is that it is more popular for recruiters to use social media during the interview process.

According to a 2018 CareerBuilder survey, 70% of employers use social media to screen candidates during the hiring process, and 43% of employers use social media to check on current employees.

Personal branding is also beneficial from the employer’s perspective

Companies should encourage employees to build strong personal brands because it’s good business. When employees are allowed to represent their company at conferences or events, they are not only developing themselves but also providing the organization more exposure. Employees can help acquire new customers and retain existing ones when they are viewed as trustworthy thought leaders.

Contract Workers Need a Personal Brand

Another reason personal branding is valuable is that the gig economy is not going away anytime soon. The average person switches jobs every 2 to 3 years, and freelance and contract workers now make up 43% of the U.S. workforce.

We’re seeing only one trend here, which is that the gig economy is big and getting bigger. Companies will do just about anything to avoid hiring full-time employees. Add to that the fact that there is no job security anymore, and workers are increasingly aware that they need to work differently if they want to create any sort of stability for themselves.”

As a result, workers need to be able to clearly communicate who they are and what they do to stand out to prospective clients and employers. If you aren’t effectively managing your online reputation, then you run the risk of losing out on business.

Personal branding masters

Developing a great personal brand doesn’t happen overnight. It’s imperative to be able to communicate your purpose and mission to your audience in a genuine way. Here are some examples of famous people who have built incredible personal brands through hard work, consistency, and long-term focus:

Oprah Winfrey:

Oprah is undoubtedly the queen of personal branding. She is continually building equity in her brand which has an estimated net worth of $2.5 billion, according to Forbes. Oprah has always stuck to her core competency: challenging millions of viewers to live the best lives possible by understanding their potential. By being true to herself, she has inspired millions to be their best selves.

Richard Branson:

Richard Branson is undeniably one of the most visible, successful, and well-known men alive. He has continually stayed true to his core values, including adventure and risk-taking. By being himself, he has often done exactly what other business leaders cautioned against, including crazy publicity stunts like dressing as a flight attendant for a competing airline. His unorthodox style and commitment to his passions have helped him create a powerful personal brand. Branson says, “Too many companies want their brands to reflect some idealized, perfected image of themselves. As a consequence, their brands acquire no texture, no character, and no public trust.”

Marie Forleo:

Marie Forleo is an inspiring teacher, writer, entrepreneur, and philanthropist. She has mastered the ability to share impactful content in a humorous and engaging way. With a following in over 195 countries, Marie challenges her fans to change the way they live in order to change the world. Her website reflects that of a personal branding expert, highlighting her authenticity and passion for helping others.

Gary Vaynerchuk:

Also known as Gary Vee, Vaynerchuk got his start by hosting a video blog on YouTube called Wine Library TV. In March 2009, he signed a 10-book deal with HarperStudio, reportedly for over $1 million, and released his first book, Crush It! Why Now is the Time to Cash in on Your Passion, in October 2009. Now, he’s one of the most successful marketers in the world and has attracted a huge loyal following. Vaynerchuk says,” Your personal brand is your reputation. And your reputation in perpetuity is the foundation of your career.”

Whether you’re looking for a better job or more sales for your company, personal branding is a given. You don’t need to be Oprah or Richard Branson to have a great personal brand. It’s a matter of continually crafting and curating your digital presence and keeping it real! Honesty, transparency, and authenticity are what will differentiate you in the long-run.

This article was originally written by executive coach, Caroline Castrillon.

Growing your personal brand on social media

Excellent advice from Pattie Lovett-Reid, chief financial commentator, CTV News – 5 ways to grow your personal brand on social media.laurie pehar borsh digital pr

 

ANALYSIS: Are you narcissistic if you’re on social media?

 

That was the question posed to me at a family BBQ on the weekend. I found myself defending those of us who use social media to get a message out, build a brand, or purely for the entertainment value. Admittedly I’m a late adopter, having only joined Instagram this past week and Twitter a few years back. However, prior to engaging, I asked experts in the field about ways to build a profile the right way, and I looked for some convincing that what I was doing was in fact a good thing to do.

 

Here is what I learned:

 

Social media is here to stay and employers hire people to ensure the person portrayed on the likes of Facebook, Twitter, Instagram is the person they think they are hiring. It has happened more than once where a candidate has been disqualified for a job after a social media search unveiled a less than ideal candidate. The question then becomes how do you develop a social media brand that shines a light on you in a good way, and helps to build your brand, not destroy it?

 

There are some obvious rules to live by, such as never post when you are angry if it is late at night or you don’t have all the facts.

 

Here are a few things I found helpful as I embarked on this brand-building social journey.

 

1) You need to take ownership of your brand. And yes, we all have a brand so you have to decide what it is you want to be known for.

 

2) Stay on top of trends, understand how your business is evolving, and be aware of changes in rules and regulations that impact you and your industry.

 

3) Think very small steps. Your brand will grow over time. It isn’t about doing one big thing right, it’s about doing a lot of little things right. It can take years to build and just one Tweet to destroy it.

 

4) Always look for opportunities. It is okay to think outside of the box but stay aligned to the goals of your organization. You don’t want to pursue a personal brand that is misaligned with the strategic initiatives of your organization. It is unlikely you will ever be bigger than the brand you work for.

 

5) Be authentic – authentic success, real success starts and ends with you being – you. Authenticity helps to build trust and in turn translates into your brand.

 

Finally, we all have to learn to say “no.” There is a tendency to want to say “yes” to every request that comes your way but by having the strength to say “no” allows you to walk away from the opportunities that don’t align with the personal brand you want to be portrayed.

 

When it comes to social media, I’m still a rookie and learning to proceed with caution. Accept it for what it is – a platform to get your message out, not a podium to hide behind, and finally, don’t let it become a productivity killer.

 

Of course the best piece of advice I already knew intuitively – never post anything your Mom wouldn’t be proud of.

 

As the Chief Financial Commentator for CTV News, Pattie Lovett-Reid gives viewers an informed opinion of the Canadian financial climate. Follow her on Twitter @PattieCTV

Is social media hurting your job search

Is your social media presence hurting your job search?

You hear a lot about what you shouldn’t post on social media, but employers are starting to grow weary of hiring candidates who lack a social presence all together. Take control of your brand by balancing your personal and professional image to attract recruiters.

Is social media hurting your job search

By Sarah K. White | CIO.com

Social media can make or break your career. We’ve all heard at least one story of an employee getting fired over a Tweet or Facebook post. And when you apply to a job, most hiring managers will first turn to Google to vet your background and qualifications.

Whichever way you swing it, you can’t avoid social media anymore, and how you manage — or don’t manage — your social presence can make or break your job hunt. It’s time to take control of your image and start thinking of social media as personal branding.

Why does it matter?

Continue reading… Read More

Personal PR on the Global Stage

I haven’t been contributing to this blog, I know in quite some time (I mean SOME time). I edit and produce for my clients. Always the plumber with the leaky faucet, but no more. Do as I say, not as I do right?

Had to share this great blog post (continue reading here), but here’s the lead in… love the gifs on this one!

Developing a Personal Brand on a Global Stage
By Shalee Hanson

I was in sixth grade the first time I remember anyone talking to me about Internet safety: “Do not EVER, put any personal information on the Internet. Don’t give out your real name. Never give out your address, or your birthdate or any other personal information. The Internet is dangerous.” To be fair, they were warning us about Internet chat rooms, so, I get it; but I remember thinking it was strange that we had this tool that connected the world and all we were ever going to do was lie to each other with it.

Fast forward to 2015, and Facebook knows my full name, date of birth, my last four places of employment, every city I’ve ever lived in, my phone number and anything else someone may want to know about me. In fact, more often than not, when I’m going to meet someone for the first time, or shortly after I’ve met them, I will spend time checking out their social channels to figure out what they’re like. Let me reiterate, before anyone in the world has ever met you, they can develop a sense of who you are. What does your personal brand say about you?

giphy

It’s crazy to think about, really. Thirteen-year-olds who have Twitter don’t even know that what they’re tweeting right now is going to be a part of their personal brand forever. If they tweet some nonsensical garbage about hating America, and years and years later they run for president, someone will find that tweet and the whole world will know that when they were thirteen, for whatever reason, they said they hated America. Is it fair? No. But it happens.

Whether you’re a regular person, a public figure or even a brand trying to navigate your way through the social playing field, here are some tips on how to develop your personal brand on the global stage:

Read the full article here – says it all!

Laurie Pehar Borsh Digital PR

Storytelling Tips to Make Your Brand More Relatable

By Richard Brownell | PR News Online 02/11/2014

The ability to tell a story is a fundamental skill that all good brand communicators should possess. Storytelling not only shares information, it makes that information relatable to the audience, humanizing complex ideas and offering fresh perspectives.

Christopher Hammond, senior vice president of corporate communications for Wells Fargo, shares some tips here on how to enhance your brand’s message through storytelling.

#1. Take it to your audience!
Read the full article here

Is outsourcing social media right for you?

Originally published on the Jaffe PR Blog on Jan 22, 2014. Jaffe PR is a complete Public Reputation resource, devoted primarily to law firms, legal associations and vendors to the legal market. Legal Brand Journalism™, including media relations and content development, is at the heart of our work for clients.

Outsource social media activities

As we all know by now, a vast majority of today’s professionals are active on a multitude of social media networks — for personal and, with increasing frequency, business purposes. What was once considered a new phenomenon in the legal industry — being present and active on social (digital) media — is fast becoming a “must-do” for attorneys (and, I’d like to add, for just about every high-profile professional, executive leader or entrepreneur).

Yes! It’s important, if not more important, for law firm attorneys (again “the above mentioned” types of business professionals) to also “show up” online.

Read the article here (click over to): Jaffe PR Blog Read More

SEVEN SOCIAL MEDIA LESSONS LEARNED IN 2013

The seven lessons learned outlined in this original post can be applied, across the board, to every industry and for both corporate and personal brands.

Reblogged from Social ‘n Sport:

….one of the keys to being successful in social media is taking the time to measure, evaluate and tweak. In an industry (in this case, the sports industry) that is constantly evolving, we have to sit back and reflect. As 2013 comes to a close, now is the perfect opportunity to put all the pieces to your social media puzzle together—what worked, what didn’t work, what stays, what goes, etc.

Read more…

Five Things I Learned About Innovation from Sir Richard Branson

Come out from behind the brand and start operating like Sir Richard Branson…

 if you want to see your business’ social media program succeed.

As you probably know by now (or are just starting to hear), a robust social media and general web presence has become a must-have for professionals who are looking to support the success of their personal as well as their own company’s online marketing and publicity strategy. Professionals (corporate leaders to politicians or artists to small business owners like me) now need to focus on social media thought leadership, public relations and reputation in order to compete for new and future business, career advancement opportunities, and even mainstream media attention.

A 2013 article in Social Media Today (10/15/12) by Sean Royer (CEO of Minneapolis-based Internet Marketing Agency SyneCore Technologies) discusses the latest IBM Study (2012 Global CEO Study) that surveyed some 17,000 CEO’s on the subject of social media usage and engagement.

The study found that only 16% of the CEOs currently participate in social media (I was not surprised to read that!). For many executives, (their own personal) social media public relations effort is one of the least-utilized methods of customer engagement–or for marketing and increasing the visibility of their business brand for that matter. The Study also found that social media will likely become the #2 way to engage customers (57%) within the next five years.

So what’s the bottom line? According to Branson, “Whether you are launching a start-up or leading an established company, you should start establishing your social media presence if you haven’t already.”  Read the article

Over the last 10 years in particular, I have found that most busy professionals (at least 75% of those I meet), simply do not have the know-how, ability and or (mainly) the time to stay on top of the production of personal content, building of network and targeted audiences, engaging and responding to people or monitoring social media activity as it pertains to her own personal or business brand and industry, (etc.)

While internal company brand marketing or public relations managers might be able to take care of (an executive’s) personal social media presence, I have found that most just do not have the bandwidth to do this. And it doesn’t really matter if it’s within a large or small organization. Then there are those professionals who might also be in career transition or those who do participate, but perhaps have not had the success they wish they could have in social media channels.

We all need to remember that social media was built for people to communicate and publicize to other people. Facebook was not built for Pepsi to market to consumers. It was built for individual people to communicate with other people on a mass level. The whole marketing of the “non personal” brand thing came along and everything got very confusing. Read the article!  Richard Branson (among other executives, like Dell and Trump) have gotten it right and got it right from the onset of Social Media. Now it’s time for the rest of the professional leadership world to step in and stop hiding behind the brand–for the good and the growth of the brand. Why wait five years or more. It takes time to build a personal social media following and thought leadership. There is no magic to it, just dedication and work.

I’ve been working with executives for years on personal branding, but mainly on a publicity and promotional level (from job search to business development to press/media placement). Social media has provided us with a new and improved personal publicity channel. However, there is a fine line to walk when it comes to personal social media publicity (promotion) and engagement–as it pertains to the promotion of a professional brand in a leadership role.