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CEOs still need to step it up on social media!

As of April 2015, CEO participation on social media is still low. That said it is becoming increasingly more important and more common for CEOs to step out from behind the desk and into the digital spotlights of social media.

 

I have been writing and preaching about this for years now! As the graphic shows below, a “social CEO” (aka a Cheif Executive Officer who uses social media to benefit and for the overall “good” of his or her organization!) is still rare.

 

The good news is there are at least a few leaders out there demonstrating what it looks like and how social media can benefit their personal and professional brands. Keep in mind that Laurie Pehar Borsh PR specializes in the production and management of CEOS and other high-level, high-profile executives on social media.

 

No! A busy executive should not go at this alone (that could be the issue).

 

CEOs and Social Media
Source: MBACentral.org

Don’t Let Your Headline Get Cut Off!

“Not everyone wants to play the game, ‘What’s the last word in the headline?’” says Andy Bechtel, associate professor at the School of Journalism and Mass Communication at UNC-Chapel Hill.

So, write web heads that don’t get truncated by Google, social media channels and mobile apps or else you’ll lose your readers’ attention.

How short? Make sure your web heads are short enough to:

  1. Get seen on Google.

Google’s search results display only the first 63 characters of your headline. To avoid getting your head cut off on Google, keep headlines to 55 characters or fewer. Remember: Google never bought a product, voted in an election or supported a cause. So write headlines for humans; optimize them for Google.

  1. Get shared on social media.

How will your headline look when it shows up on Facebook, Twitter and other social sharing sites? To avoid getting your head cut off on social media, aim for 55 characters or less.

  1. Get seen on mobile devices.

Mobile apps and websites often truncate long headlines. To avoid getting your head cut off on mobile apps, follow AP’s guideline and limit headlines to fewer than 40 characters.

  1. Reach readers on the go.

You have only a few seconds to reach mobile audiences before they swipe left or leave for another site. They want to scan at a glance, not study for a minute. Plus, long headlines get lost below the fold or take up too much valuable real estate of mobile screens.

To avoid getting your head cut off, keep your web head to 8 words or fewer, or about 40 characters. That’s the length readers can understand at a glance, according to research by The American Press Institute.

But online, shorter is better. My personal preference is web heads of 6 words or less, or about 30 characters.

In the end, it’s important to remember: Those extra words aren’t worth losing your head over. So when writing for mobile audiences, write headlines to go. Keep your head short.

Ann Wylie (WylieComm.com) works with communicators who want to reach more readers and with organizations that want to get the word out. To learn more about her training, consulting or writing and editing services, contact her at ann@WylieComm.com.

CEOs who aren’t using social media are doing their organizations a massive disservice.

What a title for a blog post – in my line of work, it better amount to some SEO for myself or else. No, I do not right a lot (these days) on my blog. Too busy running blogs and social media networks/campaigns for my clients, but I HAD to take a time out today to share this one “theme” again! This article (post) on Ragan.com, one of my regular daily go-tos for all the latest PR/Marketing news, says it all:

Study: CEOs aren’t using social media to full potential
CEO.com and analytics firm Domo found that more than two-thirds of Fortune 500 chief executives have no social media presence at all.
By Matt Wilson | Posted: September 9, 2014

CEOStudy_jpg_600x0Among Fortune 500 chief executives, only one, Mark Zuckerberg, is on all five major social networks. It probably helps that he invented one of them.

About 68 percent of the other CEOs have no social media presence at all, according to new research from CEO.com and business analytics firm Domo. Of the 162 chief execs who do have social media presences, 110 are only on one social network.

Read the rest of the study/article >here.

If you follow me on social media or this blog, you know I write about this “growing issue” a lot and have been preaching this since the dawn of social media (2003). Lots of CEOs and other C-suite professionals have heard my cry and have allowed me to help them become and remain more visible on social (and digital in general) media. In my opinion, this “push-back” so to speak is more so about having the time and the ability to do what it takes to be successful with social media. There are way too many people out there trying to push all of these fancy options for these executive leaders. It’s overwhelming! And do their corporate marketing or even outsourced PR firms handle all a CEO or any C-suiter for that matter, ON SOCIAL MEDIA. 99% OF THE TIME = NO. But, well its social media and everyone should know how to navigate it and use it right? NO!

Most CEOs leave the marketing and PR to other people in the organization they operate, but then it is assume that they have to handle their own social media outreach. Well, I am here to tell you the do not have to! Most of the guys and gals who are super active on social media DON’T handle themselves on social media (just like they don’t handle themselves on a red carpet or on a press-media junket). Social media IS media, media is media. Don’t go at it alone and especially if you run a Fortune 1000, 500 or 1 company…even a small, under 50M company. BUT a C-suite leader can’t just NOT be present online – like the article says, CEOs who aren’t are doing their organizations a massive disservice. Not to mention an under represented image as it applies to the company – in the ever-growing digital media space.

And Obviously, it’s about having a certain style out there in the biz world (as I always say, not everyone can be a Richard Branson or Bill Gates or even Donald Trump) on social media. Strong and Silent can work, as can Loud and Clear – it’s about being yourself and being real and approachable. Being active on social media is more than just about how much you say, it’s also a lot about what you do (or don’t do).

I think, I can safely say, that I know how to “lead (executives) into the light”… of being present on social (and yes, ALL of digital) media. Here are some fo the articles I’ve written “in this flavor” over the last few years:

Why your managing partners need to be on social media

Come out from behind the brand and start operating like Sir Richard Branson…

Is outsourcing social media right for you?

reputationRemember when it comes to personal or business promotion: There is no such thing as social media marketing, it’s called being able to market and promote (publicize) on social media. Further more, social media was built for humans to connect with other humans (do the math). Executive leaders will serve their organizations well if there are open to connecting and allowing others to approach and get to know them via social media. Press and media outlets also do most of their research (looking for sources, comments and so forth) online and via social media. And when a CEO is mentioned in a mainstream media article or interviewed on the air, etc. It’s important to have the online presence up and running for those instances as well. At the end of the day, all of that in combination could play out well for the organization as a whole. Putting someone in one’s corner to manage of all that on one’s behalf just may be the key to getting more CEOs (C-suite)

Social Media ROI – it takes a village

Last year, I wrote an article for Jaffe–the legal industry’s full-service PR and marketing agency, entitled Come Out from Behind the Brand. I guess you can call me a traditionalist; I am a huge proponent of staying true to what social media actually means, and how it was originally developed toconnect people with people.  If you recall (or recall hearing), “the Facebook” was developed by a Harvard student (most of us know who he is) to help students connect with students about the happenings around the university. People connecting with people and, as we all know, the rest is history. My back to basics mantra: “Social media works best when people, not the brand entities that they work for, communicate with people about what and who they like and know of, the latest news and incredible stories, etc.”

Here’s the key: the more people in “the village” (i.e. company, or really any organization of any sort) who are “talking about” various things in the social media channels that either pertain or relate directly to their organization or company (brand), in representation of that organization or company, the more likely others (people) will follow, engage and talk about these people and more importantly, about the brand (company/organization) that person and their “village” represents or leads. In doing so , all of this can and will lead to increased online visibility (digital PR and publicity!) for the brand/organization which will naturally lead to or provide new opportunities (namely new business, sales, leads, further mainstream publicity, and so forth).

>>>Read my guest post on the Jaffe Blog.

Social media network broadcasting: No sales pitch please!

twitterbroadcaster
One of the advantages of using social media networks for creating new business opportunities is the ability to share great information without having to rely solely on the traditional sales pitch approach. Absent the hard sell, “social media network broadcasting” allows for the opportunity to engage with people on a number of levels, from personal interaction to thought leadership. Broadcasting includes sharing your own original content/information, re-sharing other information and content (via your colleagues, friends or media sources), or having a conversation about a specific topic.

So, rather than looking at using your posts in social media networks as just another overt sales pitch method, try deploying a personal “broadcasting” campaign to encourage the people in your networks (LinkedIn, Twitter, Google+ and so forth) to look forward to hearing from you. That will only add to your new business development process. The more frequently the people in your networks (or your “audiences”) read about you and all the interesting things you have to say or share in their various social media network newsfeeds, the more “buzz” you can create for yourself and/or your law firm.

With the right strategy and a consistent tactical plan, your social and other online media (blogs, groups/forums) network audiences will eventually start to share, like and even comment on your broadcasted content (original articles, shared content, or back-and-forth conversations, etc.). During this process, audiences will also share your content with their audiences, who may also then share with their audiences and so on. It’s a viral process (and it doesn’t happen overnight – it takes time to build up) that will eventually add to your online public reputation and increase your online publicity, which in turn will support your traditional sales and business development processes.

That’s a win-win situation, no matter how you look at it. Rather than simply telling your public what you offer and how valuable it is, social media broadcasting allows you to demonstrate – over time and in a very direct way – why you and your product or service is of benefit and why people should believe the person (you) or the company behind it. Reading what is being shared by others in your social media network newsfeeds can also give you insight into what’s on the minds of your clients or potential clients: what they like, what they don’t like, and what they’re saying about you and your competitors.

Good information is the lifeblood of social media networking. While it’s important to create a robust profile in a variety of networks, these no longer can remain static. The more you broadcast (on any level), the better your reach-out to your audience will be. This generates publicity and enhances your public reputation, and develops web- or blogsite traffic, direct email inquiries or calls. Social media broadcasting success also benefits from the sharing of non-competitor information through your various channels, from featuring guest bloggers to recommending the products and/or services of others to your audiences.

You can easily measure the effectiveness of social media broadcast efforts to gauge the level of impact it’s having on your business. Here are some typical social media measures I look at:

-Number of new followers and connections, such as “new likes” on Facebook, followers on Twitter, connections on LinkedIn, etc.

-Traffic to your website or blog measurement from social media sources such as Twitter, LinkedIn, Facebook, etc.

-Number of new email (newsletter) list or blog subscriptions compared to your old rates before ramping up your social media efforts.

-The “reach” of your social media broadcasting efforts (how many people beyond your own network channels read/see your posts).

-Level of audience engagement (number of comments, questions, etc.).

-Number of people buying your product or service as a result of a social media network referral.

-Physical sales numbers before and after starting your social media campaign.

What else?

Know your audience: Your audience cares much less about you than about themselves, so stop making your content about you. Understand what motivates your audience, and cater to that.

Entertain: If you’re asking people to invest time into your content, the least you can do is make it worthwhile. Don’t be afraid to use humor or drama to make your message that much more interesting to read. Bonus: Being entertaining helps make you memorable.

Inform: The worst reaction you can get from your audience is a collective “So what?” Write about current events, give your opinion on trending issues or add insight to popular topics. Anything you can do to educate your audience will help show your value.

Inspire: Getting people to read a piece of content is one thing, but provoking your audience to take action is something else altogether. Great content can turn your efforts into real-world results. For example, charities often find ways to tell emotionally powerful stories of their constituents as a way to inspire viewers to donate.

Engage: What’s more interesting, a lecture or a group discussion? Most people would probably agree that the latter keeps their attention longer. Think about ways you can interweave the comments and feedback of your audience into your content. Hosting guest blogs and curating third-party and social media content can be a great way to turn your one-way channel into a two-way street.

The bottom line: If you want to get results (or ROI) out of your social media participation (investment) effort, you must you engage in social media network broadcasting. Just as traditional advertising and sales approaches remain critical components of your marketing and branding toolbox, social media network broadcasting is also becoming more and more necessary. Surprisingly, even with numerous social media networking success stories and case studies there are to learn from, many attorneys and law firms are quick to brush these off as “fluff” or gratuitous. If done well, strategically and tactically – with the right mix of solid information, social media channels, audience engagement and tangible measurements – social media network broadcasting is a proven publicity and lead-generation strategy that can get and keep you in front of your target markets and set you apart from the competition. Interestingly enough, everyone who is part of this pay-it-forward process will also benefit!

Originally published for the Jaffe Blog.

About Social Influencer Marketing

I recently attended the Influencers 2.0 | ROI of the Influencer webinar presented by Social Media Today and sponsored by Act-On Software. I thought I’d share the webinar with you (click on the link above to listen; such good information!) as well as Act-On’s white paper…

Best Practices in Social Influencer Marketing

Social influencers have been around as long as society itself. A study on the 1940 U.S. Presidential election by sociologists Paul Lazarsfeld and Elihu Katz revealed that voters were more inclined to listen to the opinions of local leaders and political commentators than speeches made by the candidates themselves. In a subsequent book, Lazarsfeld and Katz introduced a two-step communication model which shows that ideas flow from mass media to opinion leaders, and then to a wider population. The opinion leaders themselves gain their influence through more elite media, as opposed to mainstream mass media.

Today’s social media fits this model precisely. For decades, retailers have seen increases in sales when trusted experts or celebrities endorse their products or services. Movies that get good reviews tend to sell more tickets than those with bad ones. Actors endorse beauty products, watches, clothing, more. Now, with social media woven into our daily lives, more and more business buyers and consumers are reading reviews, tweets, Facebook posts, and blog posts about products or services before they decide to buy.

Online social influence is powerful. Read the White Paper >> here.

The bottom line: Social influencers are a cost-effective, efficient way to raise awareness about YOU, your company, product, or services. People trust information from opinion leaders more than they trust what comes from your marketing department, so a business that does well with social influencers has an edge over its competitors. it’s important to remember that influencers are building their own reputation as they build yours (and in my opinion, this should include ,,. By giving them something to talk about that’s a good fit for their audience, you’re helping them remain interesting and relevant.

Social Media and ROI: What Should You Expect? It depends.

Gaining ground within social media and digital/Web channels has to do with content and thought leadership. The more quality content you can generate, the more you (or your company) will be seen, heard, and followed. Add to this a high “engagement factor” (the amount of responding, sharing, that you and your followers engage in) then you are most likely on your way to a good Return on Investment (“ROI”).

That said, if you were to outright ask me, “What’s my return on investment going to look like?” I would be hard pressed to give you a number. Every client and every situation is different, from the industry or niche you operate in, to your reasons for wanting to engage in social media, to how involved and active you can or want to be.

Many of my clients come to me because they . . .

• Have little experience in social media, other than the occasional Facebook post or like, and simply don’t know where or how to start
• Don’t feel they have the time necessary to dedicate to beefing up their social media and digital presence
• Don’t know what’s reasonable to expect in return for their efforts.

Getting started and making the time are easy to address. Social media (at least how we know it as today) has been around in a big way since 2007. There’s history, there’s precedent, and there are clear do’s and don’ts. As for what’s reasonable to expect for a return on your investment . . . it depends.

With Social Media, ROI doesn’t show up as easily it does with direct marketing or advertising, where there’s a clear target and a beginning, middle, and end to a campaign. Measuring Social Media ROI is more complex, especially when Social Media is done in concert with other, more-traditional marketing efforts.

While I can clearly measure the exposure my clients get through various Social Media and Web channels—such as the number of tweets, LinkedIn shares, or Facebook posts; the number of new followers or connections; or an uptick in likes, Web traffic, and new subscribes—I can’t for certain quantify if Social Media alone is generating more sales. It’s simply impossible for me to link every client’s sale/new client acquisition to what ultimately influenced a customer to buy (unless I do a customer survey, of course, but that’s a whole other topic!). Most likely, there is no one thing that made it happen. Most likely, it’s a combination of various efforts made by my clients, including Social Media.

Social Media can go a long way to getting customers interested and to the “table,” but sealing the deal also relies on your customer/prospect’s emotional connection to your product or service, together with pricing and delivery. Is your product or service what the prospect wants? Is it what the prospect thinks he or she needs? And are you the one to provide it?

Ultimately, TV, Radio, Print, Social Media, the Web, and what you get out of your efforts with each of these mediums, is all about communication and approach. Just as most people wouldn’t produce their own TV or radio spots to sell a product or service, Social Media really should be viewed no differently—especially by busy executives and business owners who are running their companies and don’t have the time, the inclination, or the experience to optimize Social Media as a branding and messaging tool.